Monthly Archives: May 2017

Reduce The Costs In An Estate

The death of a spouse, friend or relative is often an emotional time even before estate matters are addressed.

And truth be told, death can be an expensive and cumbersome affair, particularly if estate planning was neglected, the claims against the estate start accumulating and there isn’t sufficient cash to settle outstanding debts.

People generally underestimate the costs related to death, says Ronel Williams, chairperson of the Fiduciary Institute of Southern African (Fisa). Most individuals have a fairly good grasp of significant expenses like a mortgage bond that would have to be settled, but the smaller fees can also add up.

To avoid a situation where valuable assets have to be sold to settle outstanding debts, it is important to do proper planning and take out life and/or bond insurance to ensure sufficient cash is available, she notes.

Costs

The costs involved in an estate can broadly be classified as administration costs and claims against the estate. The administration costs are incurred after death as a result of the death. Claims against the estate are those the deceased was liable for at the time of death, the notable exception being tax, Williams explains.

Administration costs as well as most claims against the estate will generally need to be paid in cash, although there are exceptions, for example the bond on the property. If the bank that holds the bond is satisfied and the heir to the property agrees to it, the bank may replace the heir as the new debtor.

Williams says quite often estates are solvent, but there is insufficient cash to settle administration costs and claims against the estate. In the event of a cash shortfall the executor will approach the heirs to the balance of the estate to see if they would be willing to pay the required cash into the estate to avoid the sale of assets.

If the heirs are not willing to do this, the executor may have no choice but to sell estate assets to raise the necessary cash.

“This is far from ideal as the executor may be forced to sell a valuable asset to generate a small amount of cash.”

If there is a bond on the property and not sufficient cash in the estate, it is not a good idea to leave the property to someone specific as the costs of the estate would have to be settled from the residue. Where a particular item is bequeathed to a beneficiary, the person would normally receive it free from any liabilities. This could result in a situation where the beneficiaries of the residue of the estate may be asked to pay cash into the estate even though they wouldn’t receive any benefit from the property, Williams says.

The most significant administration costs are generally the executor’s and conveyancing fees.

If the will does not explicitly specify the executor’s remuneration, it will be calculated according to a prescribed tariff, currently 3.5% of the gross value of the assets subject to a minimum remuneration of R350. The executor is also entitled to a fee on all income earned after the date of death, currently 6%. If the executor is a VAT vendor, another 14% must be added.

Assuming an estate value of R2 million comprising of a fixed property of R1 million, shares, furniture, vehicles and cash, the executor’s fee at a tariff of 3.5% would amount to R70 000 (plus VAT if the executor is a VAT vendor). Conveyancing fees will be an estimated R18 000 plus VAT. Depending on the situation, funeral costs may be another R20 000, while other fees (Master’s Office fees, advertising costs, mortgage bond cancellation and tax fees) can easily add another R10 000. By law advertisements have to be placed in a local newspaper and the Government Gazette, with estimated costs of between R400 and R700 and R40 respectively. Master’s fees are payable to the South African Revenue Service (Sars) in all estates where an executor is appointed with a gross value of R15 000 or more. The maximum fee is R600.

Where applicable mortgage bond cancellation costs, appraisement costs, costs of realisation of assets, transfer costs of fixed property or shares, bank charges, maintenance of assets and tax fees will also have to be paid. The executor is also allowed to claim an amount for postage and sundry costs, while funeral expenses, short-term insurance, maintenance of assets and the cost of a duplicate motor vehicle registration certificate may also have to be taken into account.

Luckily, there are ways to reduce the costs involved

Williams says the first step is to try and negotiate the executor’s fee with the appointed executor when the will is drafted. The fee could then be stipulated in the will or the executor could give a written undertaking confirming the agreed fee. But even if the deceased did not negotiate it at the time of drafting, the family or heirs can still approach the nominated executor and negotiate a competitive fee when they report the estate to the executor.

“Depending on who the executor is and what the composition of your estate is, you can probably negotiate up to a 50% discount.”

The composition of assets will generally be a good indicator of the amount of work that needs to be done and the executor will quote a fee against this background. The sale of a fixed property and business or offshore interests may complicate the process of winding up the estate.

If the surviving spouse is the sole heir, and/or there are no business interests and sufficient cash is available to cover the costs, the executor will generally offer a larger discount. Ultimately, the executor is responsible for signing off the liquidation and distribution account, confirming that all the costs are correct and that it will be settled.

Unfortunately, most of the smaller administration costs will have to be paid, with limited scope for negotiation, Williams says.

Know More About Narrowing the Self Payment Gap

It’s not even halfway through the year and your medical savings have run out, leaving you in the dreaded self-payment gap (SPG). Sound familiar?

It’s something that happens to many medical aid members, but about which many are in the dark.

“Approximately 65% of members on plans with a SPG deplete their medical savings account at some point during the year,” reveals Deon Kotze, Discovery Health R&D head.

“Of those members, two thirds reach their annual threshold and receive extended cover for day-to-day healthcare expenses.

What is it?

The SPG is an amount assigned to members, that they must pay in full for day-to-day expenses, once their medical savings have run out. These claims are submitted to the scheme, not for refunding, but to reduce and close the gap – after which the above-threshold benefit takes effect and the scheme again pays for day-to-day claims.

It’s applicable to schemes/plans with an above-threshold benefit (limited or unlimited) – usually top-end plans.

SPGs are mechanisms “which the scheme can use to transfer some of the ‘out of hospital expenses’ risk from the scheme to the member,” adds Jill Larkan, GTC healthcare consulting head. This allows schemes to reduce premiums and make [the plan] appear more attractive.

Your initial self-payment – which can increase – is the difference between your annual threshold and annual savings, Chartered Employee Benefits healthcare specialist Devlin Ross writes here.

That the SPG’s not fixed may be a surprise.

What adds to the gap?

Some claims made from savings, may add to the SPG.

Some reasons why Discovery’s SPG increases:

  • Medical savings accounts smaller than the annual threshold;
  • Members claim for over-the-counter (OTC) medicine – including schedule 0, 1 and 2 – from savings;
  • Claims submitted from the previous year and paid from savings;
  • Claims paid over a plan’s annual benefit limits;
  • Special payment applied for from savings;
  • Procedures and medicine that don’t count toward closing the SPG paid for, e.g. certain alternative treatments such as reflexology and acupuncture.

Tips for closing the gap

SPGs are only reduced by claims members pay for that are at medical aid rates, among other things, writes Ross.

For example, if you pay a GP who charges R500 – and submit the claim to the medical scheme to reduce your SPG – if the medical aid rate for a GP consultation is R320, your SPG will only reduce by R320.

As such:

  • Evaluate your medical aid plan: what you’re covered for, at what rates, with which providers and if a specific hospital or pharmacy network much be used, says Kotze. Members really wanting to avoid any SPG, must consider a comprehensive top plan, which can be costly, adds Pascale Bargehr, Total Risk business development officer.
  • Ross concurs. Ensure you really need a plan with an above-threshold benefit. If you’ve been on a plan for two years or more and have never closed your SPG, you’re likely a little over-insured. A financial advisor can assess your needs and place you on an appropriate plan.
  • Look for schemes offering benefits paid from risk. These benefits offer more value for money and are in addition to savings and day-to-day benefits.
  • When entering an SPG, ask your scheme what counts towards closing the gap. Then manage your spending efficiently to maximise benefits, writes ThinkMoney here.
  • Always use a partner network hospital, doctor or pharmacy: you won’t be charged over the rate agreed on with the scheme. This helps avoid copayments, deductibles and additional out-of-pocket expenses, says Gerhard van Emmenis, Bonitas Medical Fund acting principal officer.
  • While using your medical savings, and when in your SPG, use service providers (GPs, dentists, etc) who charge medical aid rates. Then your SPG will be at the same amount originally indicated on the benefit schedule, says David Narun of Informed Healthcare Solutions.
  • “If [hospital] procedures attract a copayment, negotiate with the provider on alternative/more conservative treatment protocols where possible, explains Ann Streak, Alexander Forbes Health senior consultant.

 

Van Emmenis and Kotze share a few more tips:

Use managed-care benefits. Some schemes offer preventative care benefits, paid from risk, not from savings, including oncology, HIV and diabetes management programmes.

Pharmacists can provide sound advice on some medical problems e.g. rashes or colds.

Pay cash for OTC medicine for less serious ailments. Consider cheaper, effective generics.

Know doctors’/specialists’ rates. Ask what rates your doctor charges and if you’ll be liable for co-payments. If affordability is a concern, look for a provider who charges medical scheme rates.

Register chronic diseases. On regular medication for a chronic illness? You may qualify for chronic medication benefits, which your scheme pays for from risk.

Schemes often have lists of medication covered in full for chronic illnesses, called ‘formularies’. Ask your doctor/pharmacist if your prescribed medicine is covered in full. If not, ask about alternatives.

Pre-authorise all hospital admissions to ensure you’re covered. Ask if copayments or sub-limits apply and how to avoid them. Ask your scheme if you’ll have better cover for planned procedures, by using contracted providers or having the procedure in a doctor’s rooms or day clinic.